Higher Ed

Report | WISPIRG Foundation | Higher Ed

Fixing the Broken Textbooks Market

The cost of college textbooks has skyrocketed in recent years. To students and families already struggling to afford high tuition and fees, an additional $1,200 per year on books and supplies can be the breaking point. As publishers keep costs high by pumping out new editions and selling books bundled with software, students are forced to forgo book purchases or otherwise undermine their academic progress.

News Release | WISPIRG Foundation | Higher Ed

Survey Shows Students Opting Out of Buying Textbooks

A survey released by WISPIRG Students at UW-Madison shows that 65% of student consumers have opted out of buying a college textbook due to its high price, and nearly half say that textbook costs can dictate whether they take a course.

News Release | WISPIRG | Higher Ed

Student Loan Interest Rate Deal Will Make Things Worse

This deal locks in $184 billion of revenue from the federal loan program over the next ten years, in the form of high interest and fees that adds to student debt and makes education more expensive.  Then, it goes further by generating an additional $715 million in revenue off the backs of borrowers, to be steered toward deficit reduction. 
 

Report | WISPIRG | Higher Ed

Issue Brief: Student Loan Debt in Wisconsin

If Congress fails to act, on July 1 the interest rate on subsidized Stafford student loans will double, from 3.4 percent to 6.8 percent. A 2007 college affordability plan lowered the rate, but expired in 2012. Last year, President Obama and Congress extended the low rate for one year.
 

News Release | WISPIRG | Higher Ed

Interest Rates for 159,147 Student Loan Borrowers in Wisconsin Set to Double on July 1

Unless Congress acts, on July 1, the interest rate for 159,147 student loan borrowers in Wisconsin will double from 3.4 percent to 6.8 percent. According to an issue brief released today by WISPIRG, the rate increase would hike the cost of Wisconsin students’ loans by $145 million. That translates into a $915 increase in debt per student, per loan.
 

Issue | Health Care

Fighting The High Cost Of Rx Drugs

Brand-name drug companies have been paying off generic drug makers to delay competition and keep prices high. This widespread pay-for-delay scheme needs to be put to an end. 

A New Direction In Driving Trends

After a 60 year boom, driving is on the decline in the U.S. and no likely scenario shows it returning to previous levels of growth. 

Report | WISPIRG | Higher Ed

The Cost of College Will Soar if Interest Rates Allowed to Double

More than 7 million students and their families rely on Subsidized Stafford Loans to help pay for college. The loans distributed by the U.S. Department of Education currently hold an interest rate of 3.4 percent. But that rate is set to double if Congress fails to act by July 1, 2012. If that occurs, millions of students will see their interest rates soar to 6.8 percent on the new loans they take in the next year thereby causing a steep rise in their loan burden and effectively increasing the cost of attaining a college degree. At a time when tuition is rising at 8.3 percent a year and median wages for young people are falling, young Americans and their families can ill afford more Washington inaction.

Media Hit | Higher Ed

The New Student Battle Cry: Don't Double My Rate!

The media and the country are just waking up to the alarming fact that unless Congress acts by July 1, the interest rate on subsidized Stafford student loans will double from 3.4 percent to 6.8 percent. Congress must not let that happen.

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